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Photo Anatomy Hollywood BW Kate

Photo Anatomy Hollywood BW Kate

This post, Photo Anatomy Hollywood BW Kate, is a description of how I created a particular photograph. The final image is a Hollywood style black and white portrait. I booked model Kate Snig from Canada for a shoot in my studio during May. I had a few ideas and shots that I wanted to get and I also booked Lisa Smith from Emma Farrell Studios for the make up and styling. I don’t have a huge amount of space to play with in the studio, but I work with what I’ve got. Haven’t much choice, really!

Photo Anatomy Hollywood BW Kate

Photo Anatomy Hollywood BW Kate.  The studio prior to the shoot. Picture: Brendan Lyon/ImageBureau

The image below is the RAW file, as shot on a Nikon D4, at ISO 640, f/5.6, 1/125 sec.  White balance set to auto. Lens was a 24-70 2.8 Nikon at 44 mm. This is the ex camera image, with no adjustments. Images from the shoot were imported into Adobe Lightroom 6.

Photo Anatomy Hollywood BW Kate

Photo Anatomy Hollywood BW Kate. The RAW file. Picture: Brendan Lyon/ImageBureau

First issue with this is the white balance.  Auto white balance in Lightroom 6 corrected this. Exposure was adjusted by +.5 and contrast increased by 15. Highlights were reduced by 25.  Shadow detail was poor so I increased blacks by 13, and the shadows and whites both needed to be increased by 25 and 40 respectively.  Vibrance was upped by 25. I reduced the Orange saturation by 16 and increased orange luminosity by 34. Sharpening was increased to 70. These adjustments were applied to a batch of images shot under the same conditions.

This is the result of the Lightroom changes:

Photo Anatomy Hollywood BW Kate

Photo Anatomy Hollywood BW Kate. The result of changes in Adobe Lightroom. Picture: Brendan Lyon/ImageBureau

Next the image was processed in Imagenomic Portraiture. This adjust the skin smoothness and some contrast. Further adjustments were made in Lightroom. White balance was made bluer by -6 to make it colder. Highlights, shadows and whites were again adjusted to obtain the level of contrast below. A slight crop for better composition was also made.

Photo Anatomy Hollywood BW Kate

Photo Anatomy Hollywood BW Kate. Further adjustments in Imagenomic Portraiture and Adobe Lightroom. Picture: Brendan Lyon/ImageBureau

The image was almost ready, but I didn’t like the shadow of the ribbon at the back of Kate’s neck.  The shadow is an integral part of the image and needed to be cleaner. So I went to Photoshop to remove it. Photoshop can do a far better job than Lightroom 6:

Photo Anatomy Hollywood BW Kate

Photo Anatomy Hollywood BW Kate. Shadow on Kate’s neck is removed. Picture: Brendan Lyon/ImageBureau

After this last edit, I converted to Black and White in Lightroom 6. I also cropped the image. It is arguable that the colour version is preferable, and some people may agree. Some argue that high contrast is an important part of the look and that shadow detail can be low and highlights high. A matter of personal taste.

Photo Anatomy Hollywood BW Kate.

Photo Anatomy Hollywood BW Kate. Picture: Brendan Lyon/ImageBureau

Ideally, the best sequence is to do the destructive work first. In other words, I should have removed the shadow from the ribbon in Photoshop first, then remove any skin imperfections, before doing anything else. After that, I would process the image in Imagenomic Portraiture. However, from a shoot that generates a lot of images under the same conditions, it is easier to make global adjustments in Lightroom. I tend to do global Lightroom changes, then Imagenomic and then tweak once more in Lightroom. I rarely use Photoshop and the ribbon issue was unusual, in fact I could have left it, but I thought the final image looked better without it.

Photo Anatomy Hollywood BW Kate

Photo Anatomy Hollywood BW Kate. Lisa applying a few touch ups. Picture: Brendan Lyon/ImageBureau

 

Lisa Smith did the Make Up and Styling at http://www.emmafarrellmakeup.com/

 

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